Posts Tagged ‘Mardi Gras’

Mardi Gras Party Ideas

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Mardi Gras just wouldn’t be Mardi Gras without the characteristic masks, beads and exotic colors, but you don’t have to stick with the usual. A Mardi Gras theme can go beyond the typical expectations with a few awesome extras. So, just in time for the celebration, we’re sharing a few of our best ideas for infusing the spirit of Mardi Gras into your event!

Start with the Food!

Mardi Gras Party IdeasFood is the best part of every party, don’t you agree? Mardi Gras is definitely a meal-ready holiday with tons of great eating choices. Pancakes are usually served on Fat Tuesday, but there are lots of options for the rest of the two-week Mardi Gras season. For your get-together, you’ll definitely want to consider serving shrimp gumbo, jambalaya or mufflueta. Some of the customary Mardi Gras sides are red beans and rice, meat balls and cole slaw. Of course, you can’t forget to finish up with yummy beignets and the traditional King Cake. (more…)

Mardi Gras Madness

Wednesday, January 18th, 2012

 

Mardi Gras

Gold chargers set off Mardi Gras decorations!

Balloons! Streamers! Masks! Action! It’s Mardi Gras time!

Surely no other celebration explodes with more bold zest, not only in New Orleans, but across the Gulf Coast region and even in Rio de Janeiro. For America it started in 1699, when French explorer Iberville camped 60 miles south of the present-day Crescent City. It was March 3, a day he knew was a big holiday back home – a holiday that dated right back to tribal rituals of the Middle Ages celebrating fertility and spring, subdued into a pre-Lenten time of merriment by the Early Church. He named their camp on the west bank of the Mississippi River “Point du Mardi Gras.”

By the late 1700s, masked balls were in vogue during Mardi Gras. The first parade took place in 1837. But the holiday had a rough track record, with its violent tendencies causing the press to call for its curtailment in the mid-1800s. The end-of-winter revelry was saved by the Comus organization in 1857, when a secret carnival society was formed to officiate a safe parade with floats, costumes and a tableau ball. The official colors of the holiday – purple (justice), green (faith) and gold (power) – were selected in 1872 by the visiting Grand Duke Alexis Romanoff of Russia. (more…)